2019: Year One in Review

Updated: Oct 22


The public launch of All Elite Wrestling began in Jacksonville, Florida on January 1, 2019. The first official matches would take place in May at the inaugural Pay-Per-View (PPV) event Double or Nothing, followed by a pair of Bleacher Report Live Specials and the first All Out PPV over the summer months. The change in season brought the onset of weekly programming with the premieres of Dynamite and Dark on October 2 and 8 respectively. In total, the year saw 152 matches over 34 events.


Notes: Dark #13 featured six Dynamite matches and other highlights from the first three months of programming on TNT. The 3 matches in the [-] column represent Lights-Out matches, which all take place after the official Main Event.


The champions are strongly represented here with World Champion Jericho and World Tag Team Champions SCU the only three to break the century mark and the Demo God having earning nearly double the MPM (Metrics Per Match) as his nearest competitor. Further, AAA Mega and AAA World Tag Champions are given special consideration here as these titles were defended on AEW programming in 2019. One absence of note from the Top 20 is Darby Allin.

Proud -N-Powerful (Santana & Ortiz) stand out as these are the only two who were not with the company for any of the pre-Dynamite events. In fact, other than the Dark Order (Evil Uno & Stu Grayson) and Jon Moxley, the entire Top 20 were in matches on the Double or Nothing card even the aforementioned three featured in separate post-match attacks including in the Main Event. Interestingly, Moxley’s first “official” (since Lights-Out matches don’t “count” in the Win-Loss records and thus don’t accrue Metrics) didn’t happen until the second episode of Dynamite, a win against Shawn Spears. This makes his Final Metrics all the more impressive.


Given the relatively few number of matches, it’s notable to observe the separation of tag team partners including The Young Bucks, Best Friends, Private Party and Dark Order. This is owing to the fact that an additional Elite Point is awarded and lost in the each match to the competitor(s) who partakes in the deciding fall; this is tracked as [+/-], or Fall Differential). See my previous column, Partnership Politics, for a more detailed breakdown of this.



Mirroring the Men’s Roster, the first Women’s World Champion Riho tops the list in dominant fashion across the board. Only Shoko Nakajima also reached double figure MPM and this was from a single match, the Main Event tag match of The Buy-In: Fight for the Fallen with Bea Priestley vs Dr. Britt Baker, DMD & Riho. This duo posted a 2019 record of 2-1 and, thus, defeating them earned Nakajima and Priestley 6.67 Quality Points.


It should be noted, and perhaps not surprisingly, the Top 4 on the Table actually represent the first four Women’s World Champions in AEW history.


Of note, I must concede that this list is not an entirely truthful representation of the Top 20 as I have taken a few liberties to highlight those who won a match (Hayter, Shanna, Swole and Bates) but, due to multiple losses, ended up with negative Final Metrics for the calendar year. For example, Leva Bates was 1-4 in 2019 and never scored a pin but still ranks above Ford and Sakazaki, who each ended the year 0-2. Further, as these two were announced “All Elite” and listed on the official Roster Page, we can use the benefit of foresight to rank them here for later comparative analysis. Also, those who wrestled and did not eliminate anyone in the All Out Battle Royal (Faby Apache, Jazz, Teal Piper, Tenille Dashwood) or had just one match, such as Machiko, have also been set aside to look at the bigger picture going forward. In summary, it is clear the partial or short 2019 Season gave us a fairly accurate glimpse of what was to come going forward. If you enjoyed this, be on the lookout for a follow-up article looking at the much busier 2020 next week.


Anyone with questions or comments is encouraged to respond here or on Twitter @AEWmetrics.

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